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How to spot a fake Spotify playlist

Having your music placed on as many private users' Spotify playlists as possible is something that every artist in 2023 is trying to achieve to push their music to the next level.

In case you haven't noticed (I am sure you have), those type of playlists became an absolute nightmare in the last five years and it is extremely difficult to identify which playlists are real and which ones are fake.


There are many platforms out there like Submithub and Playlist Hunter where you can send your song to different curators worldwide, however it is still very hard to tell the difference between what will drive you to real interested fans instead of bots and fake streams.


There are few tricks that you can use to spot a fake Spotify playlist:


spotify playlist scam

1 - If it's too good to be true....it's probably a scam!


If you see extreme picks on your song in your Spotify for Artist, way too many saves than expected and a very high ratio of streams per listeners (like ten streams per user), you are probably getting fake streams.


2 - Big gaps between countries


If streams are coming mainly from one city and there is a big gap between two different countries (like 95% of streams come from Mexico City while 5% come from Los Angeles)....it's probably a scam!


3 - Followers vs streams ratio


If a playlist has a very random ratio of followers and streams, it’s probably not legit. For example, if the playlist has thousand and thousand of streams but almost zero followers, stay away!



I would like to stress one last point about private users' Spotify playlists: asking for money in return of a playlist spot goes against Spotify's regulation and is therefore illegal. Make sure that you use platforms like Submithub and Playlist Hunter: in this case, you are paying curators to listen to your music, which ultimately does not guarantee that they will add it to their playlists. It's a bit of a grey zone, however it's perfectly legal.

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